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This road in France can only be used twice daily, then it vanishes underwater

It disappears under 13ft of water.
  • There’s a road in France that can only be used twice a day before it disappears
  • Waves cover it under four meters (13 feet) of water
  • The Passage du Gois is a causeway that links the Gulf of Burnëf and Beauvoir-sur-Mer with the picturesque island of Noirmoutier

Published on Apr 9, 2024 at 8:07PM (UTC+4)

Last updated on Apr 10, 2024 at 3:10PM (UTC+4)

Edited by Adam Gray
This road in France can only be used twice daily, then it vanishes underwater

There’s a road in France that can only be used twice a day before it’s engulfed and disappears under four meters (13 feet) of water.

The Passage du Gois, sometimes known as Le Passage de Gôa, is a causeway that links the Gulf of Burnëf and Beauvoir-sur-Mer with the picturesque island of Noirmoutier.

It sits in Vendée on the Atlantic coast of France and acts as a fascinating example of the ferocious power of nature.

READ MORE! Rinspeed creates James Bond inspired supercar that becomes a submarine

But the 4.125-km (2.6-mile) stretch of road has something else unique about it, other than amazing sea views.

Drivers are only permitted to use it twice a day for a few hours before it floods.

Half-land, half-waterway: the stone-paved road vanishes beneath the waves during high tide as the sea level rises.

This means drivers must watch out for approaching waves.

This can be safely gauged by special side panels on the road, and special digital panels that let people know whether the road is passable.

These panels are regularly updated with sea level warnings and issue speed-limit reminders.

Over the years, people have become trapped on the long stretch of road by rising water levels, and there have even been deaths.

Despite the island boasting 40 km (25 miles) of secluded, sandy beaches lined with quaint beach huts and an abundance of rock pools, tourists are advised against using the road unless necessary.

However, nearly 10,000 locals live on the island of Noirmoutier all year round.

They’ve learned to respect the warning panels when arriving, departing, or transporting supplies from the mainland.

If an accident does occur, scalable emergency towers are available for people to climb and wait for help to arrive.

Not unlike the school bus that got stranded in a Dubai flood and was rescued by a hero Toyota driver.

Aside from adding a little spice to your drive, drivers must check the tide times before crossing the Gois Passage.

It’s possible to get across an hour and a half before, and an hour and a half after low tide.

In the past, the only way to reach the island of Noirmoutier was by boat, as it wasn’t always connected to the mainland.

However, over the last few centuries, the Bay of Bourgneuf silted to create a causeway and Le Passage du Gois was first mentioned on a map in 1701.

Since then, it’s twice been featured in the world-renowned Tour de France bicycle race.

Cars that would deal with the sudden influx of water include the Tesla which underwent the first real-world wade test on a Cybertruck to see if it really can be a ‘boat’.

In addition, an EV launched in China that can go ‘swimming’ and fully submerge underwater.

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