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BMW-powered flying car AirCar bought by China

The future is here!
  • Developed and successfully test-flown in Europe, the AirCar has recently caught the attention of a Chinese firm.
  • Powered by a robust 160bhp 1.6-litre BMW engine, the AirCar is a marvel of engineering.
  • What’s more remarkable is its ability to transform from a car into an aircraft in just over two minutes.

Published on Mar 27, 2024 at 1:30PM (UTC+4)

Last updated on Mar 27, 2024 at 8:14PM (UTC+4)

Edited by Tom Wood

Whenever we used to think about the future, we dreamt of owning a flying car, and vehicles that could seamlessly transition from roads to skies. That dream is now becoming a reality with the AirCar.

This two-seat wonder is not just any car, it can fly!

Developed and successfully test-flown in Europe, the AirCar has recently caught the attention of a Chinese firm, signaling a new chapter in the realm of personal transport.

READ MORE: Elon Musk is making a change to how Tesla delivers vehicles to customers

Powered by a robust 160bhp 1.6-litre BMW engine, the AirCar is a marvel of engineering.

It can soar up to 8,200ft in the air and cruise at a speed of 118mph.

What’s more remarkable is its ability to transform from a car into an aircraft in just over two minutes.

Earlier, the car underwent rigorous testing, completing 70 hours of flight testing and over 200 takeoffs and landings to meet stringent safety standards.

The recent acquisition by Hebei Jianxin Flying Car Technology Company marks a significant development.

This Chinese firm now holds exclusive rights to manufacture and utilize AirCar aircraft within a specific region of China.

Their investment underscores China’s growing interest in pioneering flying transport solutions, following its trailblazing success in the electric vehicle (EV) revolution.

But the journey towards widespread adoption of flying cars isn’t without its challenges. Infrastructure, regulation, and public acceptance remain significant hurdles.

Aviation experts emphasize the need for global regulation to control this emerging sector effectively.

While prototypes like the AirCar evoke excitement, the reality may involve aspects such as proper air traffic control and hundreds of new guidelines.

In essence, the sale of the AirCar to China hints at a potential shift in the global market for flying cars.

As this brave new world of personal transport unfolds, it presents both opportunities and challenges, reshaping traditional categories and regulations along the way.

Some images in this article were generated using AI

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